Geography

Mljet lies south of the Pelješac peninsula, from which it is divided by the Mljet Channel. Its length is 37 kilometres (23 mi); its average breadth 3.2 kilometres (2.0 mi). It is of volcanic origin,[citation needed] with numerous chasms and gorges, of which the longest, the Babino Polje, connects the north and south of the island. Port Polače, the principal harbour in the north, is a port of call for tourist ferries. Mljet contains one hotel—The Odisej (from the Greek Odysseus) in the north-west corner of
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Mljet History

Mljet was discovered by ancient Greco-Roman geographers, who wrote the first records and descriptions. The island was first described by Scylax of Caryanda in the 6th century BC; others prefer the text, Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax. In both texts, it is named Melite and supported by Apollonius of Rhodes. Agathemerus and Pliny the Elder call the island Melita.[5] Agesilaus of Anaxarba in Cilicia, the father of Oppian, was banished to Mljet by the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus (AD 145–211) (or to Malta byLucius Verus: see Oppian). Monastery of Saint Mary Mljet is mentioned around 950 by the Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogenitos in his Of
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Settlements

Mljet (pronounced [mʎɛ̂t]; Latin: Melita, Italian: Meleda) is the most southerly and easterly of the larger Adriatic islands of the Dalmatia region of Croatia. The National Park includes the western part of the island, Veliko jezero, Malo jezero, Soline Bay and a sea belt 500 m wide from the most prominent cape of Mljet covering an area of 54 km2. The central parts of the park are Veliko jezero with the Isle of St. Mary, Malo jezero and the villages
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